photo: Marco Pezzati

Solo Siento

“This disturbed fog of shadows, raging within, how can I dissolve it?” Raymond Queneau Zaides dances on stage, his shadow falls on a white screen at the back of the stage. As he moves, the shadow follows his steps, twitching or changing its form until no longer resembling a human figure. The mimetic practice reveals an inner struggle, an intensive dynamics that leaves Zaides lying on the ground in a state of exhaustion. A video projection portrays a dream-like scene: The shadow multiplies to creates hybrid shapes, while Zaides’ body hovers in mid air or bounces off the ground as if unconstrained by gravity.  Solo Siento was premiered at the Curtain Up Festival, Tel Aviv, 2005.

Credits & Collaborators

By Arkadi Zaides, Shira Miasnik Choreography & dance Arkadi Zaides Video Shira Miasnik Music Adam Scheflan, Leni Ben Basat Sound mastering Ronen Rot Costume Brigitte Cartier (Baladi Company)
The empathetic view in the theater

For all our Flemish and Dutch speaking friends, the Belgian magazine Etcetera has released an article by theater scholar Esther Tuypens discussing the use of empathy in performing arts. The article analyzes mechanisms of emotional identification in Arkadi Zaides’ creation Archive as well as in Milo Rau’s Empire. It is available online

25 February 2019

How can we rethink the documentary in art in terms of content, form and method? The School of Speculative Documentary is an interdisciplinary space for an ​encounter that seeks to question the documentary act. Creators take the floor to discuss uncertainty and guesswork, to confront the unfixable holes in their work and the messiness of reality.

Usages Géopolitiques Des Images

What influence do images have on migration policies? How do dictatorial regimes produce their imagery? Is there an ethical way to document war zones? USAGES GÉOPOLITIQUES DES IMAGES is a new publication that sets to examine these issues through the works of various contemporary artists. The book compiles the writing of twelve contributors, among them is Frédéric Pouillaude, whose essay examines  Zaides' practice over the past years.